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French

MODERN FOREIGN LANGUAGES AT FRESSINGFIELD PRIMARY SCHOOL                   SEPT 2016

“Learning a language enriches the curriculum. It provides excitement, enjoyment and challenge for children and teachers, helping to create enthusiastic learners and to develop positive attitudes to language learning throughout life. The natural links between languages and other areas of the curriculum can enhance the overall teaching and learning experience. The skills, knowledge and understanding gained can make a major contribution to the development of children’s oracy and literacy and to their understanding of their own culture/s and those of others.” Framework for Languages (DfES 2005)

Since 2014 the teaching of a Modern Foreign Language to all KS2 children has been a part of the statutory curriculum. At Fressingfield Primary School, we believe strongly in the benefits of learning a modern foreign language: language learning is fun, active, challenging and enjoyable and it leads to wider benefits across the curriculum, such as the development of literacy skills and to a greater understanding of themselves and others.

At Fressingfield Primary School the children learn French throughout Key Stage 2. French is taught on a two-year cycle, so that children in Years 3&4 and Years 5&6 don’t repeat the same subjects as a new year group joins their class at the end of the year.

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LANGUAGE LEARNING STIMULATES CREATIVITY

Children enjoy taking an active part in language lessons. They join in with singing, reciting rhymes and poems and responding to stories. They create sketches and role-play, imitating accurate intonation and pronunciation. They play games, take turns, make things, take the role of the teacher and experiment creatively with language.

LANGUAGE LEARNING SUPPORTS ORACY AND LITERACY

Children spend much of their language lessons speaking, listening and interacting – more that in most other subjects. They take part in role-plays, conversations and question and answer work. They sing songs, perform to an audience and respond to a wide range of aural stimuli. This emphasis on communication, including language learning’s important role in the ‘education of the ear’ underpins children’s capabilities in oracy, which is critical to effective communication as well as a key foundation for literacy.

LANGUAGE LEARNING LEADS TO GAINS ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

Children approach a broad range of learning activities in a new and challenging context;  these relate to mother tongue literacy, to mathematics and other subject areas such as geography, music and citizenship. This can lead to deep learning and significant gains in their general understanding as they recycle and reinterpret existing knowledge. Through the conscious development of language learning they are also learning how to learn.

LANGUAGE LEARNING SUPPORTS AND CELEBRATES THE INTERNATIONAL DIMENSION

Although it enjoys much more linguistic diversity than in the past, England remains a place where the motivation to learn another language is affected by the position of English as a widely spoken, world language. This makes it even more important that we give all children the chance to learn a language in order to gain insights into their own lives and those of others around the world. They need the chance to make contact with people in other countries and cultures and to reflect upon their own cultural identities and those of other people.